University Study on Sexism In BBC’s Doctor Who (Infographic)

In April 2014, I completed a study, with several other students, for my Media Research Methods class, which we then entered into BYU-Idaho’s Research and Creative Works Conference. My group’s research took second place. Many have asked to see that, so here is the final report. 

IS DOCTOR WHO SEXIST-01 2

Is Doctor Who Sexist?

Back in 2010 Steven Moffat took over as head writer of the cult classic British Sci-Fi Doctor Who from Russell T. Davies. Davies had headed the reboot of the show back in 2005. When the switch happened many fans began voicing problems they were having with the new direction of the show. One of those problems was sexism, or at least that is what people were claiming. However some fans of Moffat said people were being overly sensitive and just couldn’t let go of the RTD era. So which side was right? We sat down and watched all of the episodes since the reboot to the departure of the Pond’s (excluding a couple specials) to figure out if there was a quantifiable answer to the claims that female character writing had taken a nose dive.

We conducted two major tests on all the companions since 2005 that had completed their tenure in the show. The first was a Bechdel Test, and then the second was speaking time.

The Bechdel Test was developed for films. To pass, a movie must have at least two women in it who talk to each other, about something besides a man. This was applied to each episode the specific companion was in. The companion scores ended up looking like this:

Bechdel Test:

Rose: 74% with 23/31 passed

Martha: 78% with 14/18 passed

Donna: 100% with 16/16 passed

Amy: 53% with 17/32 passed

*River: 57% with 8/12 passed

How it was determined if a conversation qualified:

Conversations were allowed to pass if they were not centered around a man but did briefly mention one. This was to allow for a companion to be able to mention the Doctor, for example if someone were asking where they were from they could say “Oh, I came here in a box with a man called the Doctor,” and then carried on. Or also perhaps two women discussing something where they may briefly mention their brother, employer, etc. If the mention of the man was removed from the conversation, the purpose of the conversation would still stand. An episode could also pass if the conversation(s) happened in the presence of/with a man as long as it was still between at least two women who were actually conversing with each other (i.e. more than one or two lines and was clearly directed at each other), and about something besides a man. However, conversations where two women were addressing the Doctor (or another man), and not really talking to or acknowledging each other, were not included. This was to allow for three (or more) way conversations, since the test did not say that a man/men observing/participating in the conversation with two or more women disqualified it. A simple address was not considered as a conversation. The women had to have more than a two line exchange. (See end of post for a full list of failed episodes.)

Next we measured the companion’s average speaking time per episode.

Companion Speaking Time:

Rose speaking time: 2:37

Martha speaking time: 3:15

Donna speaking time: 3:46

Amy speaking time: 2:35

*River speaking time: 3:06

Finally, we did a comparison between the numbers from Russell T. Davie’s era and Steven Moffat’s era.

RTD vs. Moffat

Number of episodes that failed the Bechdal test

89% (24/27) of the episodes written by RTD passed the Bechdel test with 78% (45/58) passing during his era.

57% (12/21) of  the episodes written by Steven Moffat passed the Bechdel test, with 58% (19/33) passing during his era.

Speaking time

Companion Speaking time went from 3:12 to 2:35 per episode, a19% decrease.
Female Speaking time went from 8:30 to 5:46 per episode, a 32% decrease.
Female Speaking roles went from 5.5 to 4.2 per episode, a 24% decrease.

But What About River Song?

Ironically, the woman who is often propped up as proof that Steven Moffat is, in fact, not a sexist was one of the worst in terms of the Bechdel test and overall independence of thought and character. While maintaining an average speaking time, the episodes she is in only pass the Bechdel Test 57% of the time, and she herself only passes 42% of the time. She also never passes it on her own after Series 5. It is also important to note that River’s “passes” barely scraped by this test. Her passing conversations were always around three or four lines of exchange total, limited to one per episode, and were always in the presence of/with the Doctor.

Personal Commentary

As I watched these episodes again with a fine tooth comb, I noticed many things that were not included with this study, as they were not quantifiable, which was the purpose of this research. One thing that struck me was the difference between Rose Tyler and River Song, and how the two writers dealt with the main love interest during their run. I came across the following post on Tumblr while I was conducting my analysis, and I think it pertains to this conversation.

9c78d4be0254c3f45cb78edd3981923f

(Just for the record, I am neither of those users.)

I think when it comes to giving women love interests in fiction, you have to let them maintain their own independence of thought. This keeps them from simply becoming a sex object or plot device. Rose (and Martha and Donna) had that in spades. While both Rose and River had their share of arguments with The Doctor, how they handled them was drastically different. Rose argued when she had moral issue with his choices, stood her ground, defended others, and overall became the moral compass of their relationship. River rarely if ever, disagreed on issues or principles. If asked to do something she disagreed with she would just yell, “I hate you,” and then do it. Her mentality toward The Doctor can be summed up with a conversation she has with Amy in series 6. The Doctor has left them with instructions Amy does not want to do, but River tells her, “We’re going to as The Doctor’s friends always do. As they’re told.” I think I just heard Rose, Martha, Donna, Romana, and Sarah Jane slap you. When it comes to River Song, it seems that audiences were fooled into thinking she was a strong female character because of her propensity toward violence, and some admittedly excellent monologues.

I think there is a discussion to be had here though. I think Rose probably should have had more speaking time, but then again maybe people who are quiet may not be oppressed. Writing a variety of women is important, and there may be times you want to write a girl who doesn’t say much. That’s ok. I simply think that its important to make sure women have their voices heard, and at the same time avoid the “Strong Female Character” stereotypes. I suppose the most important thing would be to simply write people. I think Moffat struggles with this in general, but especially when writing any sort of romantic female character. (Fun fact, Rose’s Bechdel test score would have been in the 80′s were it not for the episodes Moffat wrote during her run.)

I got asked a lot of questions while presenting this about this research confining women to only one type of character to be seen as good. I was very happy that these questions came! For one, it meant many people knew that a variety of women should be represented. However, the purpose of this was to study trends. Yes, there may be outlier episodes where it’s only the companion and The Doctor, and will there for not pass the Bechdel test, but this research allows us to see where the overall show is going. Writing a woman who doesn’t talk as much is fine, but when it becomes an overall trend to have all of the female characters failing the Bechdel Test and not speaking, that is when it becomes a problem. If you truly were writing a diverse group of women, those outliers wouldn’t matter.

Of course there’s a lot to be said outside of what I’ve mentioned above about the data and it’s implications. This was just one of the meant things I noticed as I rewatched the show. But what do you think? I’d love to hear all of your insights, so feel free to blow up that comment section!

I don’t think this will end the sexism debate. I realize I attempted to quantify something that is largely opinion based, and there will be some who will prefer Amy’s 2:35 to Donna’s 3:46, and say more isn’t better. Some will make excuses for episodes not passing the Bechdel Test, and all that’s fine. I acknowledge the limitations of this study. When it comes right down to it though, these are the numbers if you want them. But your thoughts are your own, so do with this as you will.

Episodes that failed the Bechdal Test:

“Father’s Day”

“The Empty Child”

“The Parting of the Ways”

“The Girl in the Fireplace”

“Rise of the Cybermen”

“The Age of Steel”

“The Satan Pit”

“Doomsday”

“Daleks in Manhattan”

“Evolution of the Daleks”

“The Family of Blood”

“The Sound of Drums”

“The Eleventh Hour”

“Amy’s Choice”

“The Hungry Earth”

“Vincent and the Doctor”

“The Lodger”

“A Christmas Carol”

“Day of the Moon”

“The Curse of the Black Spot”

“Let’s Kill Hitler”

“Night Terrors”

“Closing Time”

“The Wedding of River Song”

“Asylum of the Daleks”

“A Town Called Mercy”

“The Angels Take Manhattan”

Excluded episode: The Girl Who Waited. I couldn’t decided whether or not it was a pass or fail, so you can go decide.

*As River Song was never a full time companion, her averages were not incorporated into the overall numbers, such as “Average companion speaking time.”

If you would like to hear an interview I gave on the topic, go check out this episode of 2MTL!

Disclosure: I do not in any part own BBC’s Doctor Who. The photos used in the infograpic do not belong to me. This study and it’s contents are copyrighted by Rebecca Moore, and are not associated with Brigham Young University Idaho beyond what was disclosed in the opening paragraph. BYUI does not own or have responsibility for this research. I received no funding or any sort of monetary compensation from them.  

Credit to other group members: Joseph Struhs (@Joseph_Struhs), Tyler Minetto, Joseph Meldrum, Zak Ison

NOTE TO COMMENTERS:  Due to the recent popularity of this post, there are many comments coming in, and I will most likely not be able to read them all in depth and respond.

To address a few issues though, I am aware the Bechdel test has flaws, as do our other methods. This was simply to study trends between authors. However, I don’t think the whole thing should be dismissed simply because of issues with one part. All of the information is statically significant and a good starting point. I’ve seen many suggestions for expansion or improvement that are very good. I probably will not be expanding this though, simply because I do not have the time. If you wish to sit down and do hours of analysis, feel free. And, as a note to those who say I have too much time on my hands or some other such nonsense, I was in a Media Research Methods class. I had to choose media to research for my final to pass it. It wan’t just for fun. Analytics is an important skill for my industry. I saw an issue being brought up by others, and I attempted to quantify it.

Beyond any of that, please try and refrain from hostility against your fellow commenters. 

Like this post? Wanna help a soon-to-be recent graduate? Click here!

PayPalDonateNow1

About these ads

578 thoughts on “University Study on Sexism In BBC’s Doctor Who (Infographic)

  1. “DOCTOR: I could be anything.”

    Could but still remained male. There’s even talk Charles Dance will be the next Master. Again male actor.

    “Please let me explain this to you again. These are not proper polls. These are polls of fans, not of Doctor Who’s overall viewership.”

    I only asked you to take a look and you thumbed your nose saying its not official? These are fans who haves poken and voted on BOTH sides of the equation. Yes there are people who like the idea of having a female Doctor but there’s also the other side who doesn’t. Aren’t you curious as a researcher?

    “The only way to do a poll properly on this subject would be to get a company to phone up, out of the blue, a large cross section of people and ask them.”

    So why don’t you do it?

    “There is not drill. If work dries up for Tennant in a few years, and Doctor Who has become a ratings disaster, then Tennant could come back. There was even talk of inviting Tom Baker to come back to play Doctor Who when the show’s return was first being considered.”

    Doctor Who became a ratings disaster in the 80′s and they canned the show even though that was due to inside fighting and senior execs. They didn’t ask Tom Baker to rescue it after McCoy. Baker would say no to that. The TV Pilot didn’t do well either because FOX pitted it against Rosseane which trashed it ratings wise. They chose not to bother til 2005. It will be a matter of time when the Beeb will lose interest again and no one wants to carry on till someone revives it again in say 5-10-15 years. Tennant will be alright even if his career dries up there’s always the theater as a teacher or director.

    “. Perhaps you’d be happier staring at a test card?” Now, now be nice. I’ve been very patient with your snarky remarks and correction.

    “Sarah didn’t need bolstering, she was already considered the queen of companions. B.T.W, S.J.A was C.R.A.P.”

    Till River Song came along. Not a fan of hers though. Wow you really dislike Sarah Jane. Not mocking you ok. Just noticed.

    “I did watch ‘The Five Doctors’ but the idea is rubbish. In ‘The Deadly Assassin,’ Engin says, “After the twelfth regeneration, there is no plan that will postpone death.”

    Apparently Terence Dicks had other ideas since he wrote The Five Doctors. I guess it was a bit of payback for Robert Holmes and Philip Hinchcliffe’s tampering of Brain of Morbius?

    “Good, that’s because they want to learn. Answer the questions honestly, don’t lie to them or make out as if something is a terrible taboo subject.”

    What if they don’t like the idea of a female Doctor? What then?

    “They also know he is an alien from another planet who can change shape.”

    But they know he’s been male for the past 51 years.

    “I don’t remember there being any suggestion that the Metacrises clone was Doctor number 11. I think the idea was that the Doctor regenerated himself as Tennant and then sent the overspill energy into the hand, which then, though some bollocks, created the Metacrises Doctor.”

    RTD believed that it not a complete regeneration.

    “In reality, of course, Tennant was originally meant to have regenerated into a different actor, but then he decided to stay on for the specials.”

    He stayed to help with the transition from RTD to Moffat from what I understand.

    Yes thanks for the correction The Death Zone. I have not seen The Five Doctors in over a decade. Loved The Three Doctors though.

    “Unless, of course, you happen to be a deeply prejudiced person who has some twisted desire to pass those prejudices onto their child.”

    Now now be nice. I have been very patient with you and with your snarky remarks. :) We can be civil as this line on the page has stated “please try and refrain from hostility against your fellow commenters.” Would you at least consider that should you reply? Yes I may have poked fun at you once or twice apologies for that but you make it easy. We all have prejudices even you. Everyone.

    • ““DOCTOR: I could be anything.””
      “Could but still remained male.”

      Here is the dictionary definition of ‘Anything.’ ’1. anything whatever, something no matter what. 2. A thing of a kind. 3. in any degree; to any extent; in any way; at all.’ It doesn’t say, ‘but not male,’ does it?

      “I only asked you to take a look and you thumbed your nose saying its not official?”

      Again, please read this carefully. It’s not just unofficial, it’s meaningless. It’s worthless. It has no value. You cannot use it to back up your opinion.

      “These are fans who haves poken and voted on BOTH sides of the equation. Yes there are people who like the idea of having a female Doctor but there’s also the other side who doesn’t. Aren’t you curious as a researcher?”

      No, because it is a poll on the internet. It is not something that has been run with any scientific rigour. I may as well put a poll up on my website and fix a result saying 100 million people want a female Doctor, and it would be of similar value to the ones you keep pointing me at.

      ““The only way to do a poll properly on this subject would be to get a company to phone up, out of the blue, a large cross section of people and ask them.””
      “So why don’t you do it?”

      Okay, done it. I’ve just phoned up five thousand people and four thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine of them said they wanted a female Doctor. Only one person said no, and I think that was probably you. Did you get a call from me today?

      “Doctor Who became a ratings disaster in the 80′s and they canned the show even though that was due to inside fighting and senior execs. They didn’t ask Tom Baker to rescue it after McCoy.”

      Jonathan Powell was trying to kill Doctor Who, so why would he put any effort into reviving a show he hated?

      ” Baker would say no to that.”

      You seem very well informed on what Tom Baker would and wouldn’t do in 1989.

      “It will be a matter of time when the Beeb will lose interest”

      From what I’ve been hearing, Doctor Who was considered for the chop very recently.

      “again and no one wants to carry on till someone revives it again in say 5-10-15 years. Tennant will be alright even if his career dries up there’s always the theater as a teacher or director.”

      So you think he’d rather remain a teacher than return to head the revival of his favourite programme?

      ““. Perhaps you’d be happier staring at a test card?””
      ” Now, now be nice. I’ve been very patient with your snarky remarks and correction.”

      Dictionary definition of ‘snarky’. ‘Testy or irritable; short.’ See? None of that applies to my answers, and to be honest, I’m the one who is being patient with you. None of this stuff about a female Doctor has anything really to do with the above study. You appear to have the strange idea that if you can convince me that a female Doctor is a bad idea, then by magic it will never come to pass. Well, it may come to pass, who knows what the future holds? Not me. Not Moffat. Not you. Not anyone. Equally, what’s wrong with being corrected? Don’t you want to be corrected? If I make a factual error and someone points it out, I’m grateful.

      ““Sarah didn’t need bolstering, she was already considered the queen of companions. B.T.W, S.J.A was C.R.A.P.””
      “Till River Song came along.”

      In whose book?

      “Not a fan of hers though. Wow you really dislike Sarah Jane.”

      I don’t dislike Sarah Jane. I’m just not happy with what the new series did to the character.

      “Apparently Terence Dicks had other ideas since he wrote The Five Doctors. I guess it was a bit of payback for Robert Holmes and Philip Hinchcliffe’s tampering of Brain of Morbius?”

      That wasn’t tampering. That was improving.

      “What if they don’t like the idea of a female Doctor? What then?”

      Then they will have learned a useful life lesson, that we can’t have everything we want.

      ““They also know he is an alien from another planet who can change shape.””
      “But they know he’s been male for the past 51 years.”

      Then that will be another valuable life lesson for them. That just because something has been around for a long time, it doesn’t mean it’s going to last forever. Take a look at the Soviet Union, or the British Empire, or the soon to be dissolved country of Iraq. We live in a world of impermanency, where people who cling onto the past usually remain there.

      “RTD believed that it not a complete regeneration.”

      As RTD is no longer in charge of the show, it doesn’t really matter, does it?

      “He stayed to help with the transition from RTD to Moffat from what I understand.”

      I think it’s more the case that Tennant sided with what he then thought was the more powerful force in television. Turned out he was wrong.

      ““Unless, of course, you happen to be a deeply prejudiced person who has some twisted desire to pass those prejudices onto their child.””
      “Now now be nice. I have been very patient with you and with your snarky remarks. :)”

      It wasn’t a snarky comment, it was a serious comment.

      “”We can be civil as this line on the page has stated “please try and refrain from hostility against your fellow commenters.””

      I’m not being hostile, I am making a genuine enquiry as to the reason why you dislike the idea of a female Doctor Who, and why you somehow feel it will be damaging to your kids? The fact that you are refusing to give an answer is a pretty clear indicator of where your prejudice coming from. Perhaps you would like to disabuse me of this idea?

      • “Again, please read this carefully. It’s not just unofficial, it’s meaningless. It’s worthless. It has no value. You cannot use it to back up your opinion.”

        And you tell me i’m being prejudiced.

        “Okay, done it. I’ve just phoned up five thousand people and four thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine of them said they wanted a female Doctor. Only one person said no, and I think that was probably you. Did you get a call from me today?”

        It wasn’t me sorry. Nice try but your sarcasm gave you away.

        “That just because something has been around for a long time, it doesn’t mean it’s going to last forever.”

        The same can be applied to the show. Like I said The BBC can and will cancel any show their discretion. They did it in the late 80′s and you said RTD made a recommendation which they ignored. In the end if they don’t find a successor to Moffat (Chris Chibnall has his hands full. Mark Gatiss is iffy and Neil Gaiman said he won’t do it) they can call it a day.

        “I don’t dislike Sarah Jane. I’m just not happy with what the new series did to the character.”

        Fair enough.

        ““Sarah didn’t need bolstering, she was already considered the queen of companions. B.T.W, S.J.A was C.R.A.P.”” Till River Song came along.” In whose book?”

        Not mine. I’m not even a fan of River. I see so many admins on fansites that use her name and call everyone sweetie.

        “Then they will have learned a useful life lesson, that we can’t have everything we want.”

        Any parent can teach that to a kid by saying “NO,” when they throw a temper tantrum. You don;t need a TV show for that.

        “That wasn’t tampering. That was improving.”

        Terrance Dicks didn’t think so and was extremely angry with Robert Holmes.

        “I’m not being hostile.”

        Not hostile? There was one guy who posted (no not the other poster who you had a lively debate with) his opinion and you ripped him to shreds.

        “I am making a genuine enquiry as to the reason why you dislike the idea of a female Doctor Who,”

        I’m not too crazy about the idea. Its just too gimmicky. I don’t see the need for it. And does it have to be The Doctor who needs to change gender? Why didn’t The Master who changed into a snake like creature? Why didn’t River? Why didn’t Borusa? Romana teased it but she went on to be female. Rassilon was male in End of Time. RTD could have explored the idea tentatively with The Master or Rassilon but he kept their original gender. Moffat certainly didn’t do it and cast Smith and now Capaldi despite the hints. Its like Bruce Wayne or Indiana Jones getting a transgender surgery when they have female counterparts like Batgirl, Lara Croft even Celina Kyle. Just bring in another female Time Lord like The Rani or Romana and get a writer that will really develop them. Not Moffat. That’s where he is weak. I didn’t say I have kids. I just don’t like the idea of kids getting confused as to why the character they have known as a male is all of a sudden a woman. My nephew was upset when Matt Smith left. Is that a good enough answer for you? If its not then, I can’t help you and I don’t expect you to accept my answer.

        Look if a female actress gets cast, fine but it does not mean I agree with the decision. I’m just not sold on the idea. Thank you.

      • “And you tell me i’m being prejudiced.”

        You *are* prejudiced. You also have no concept of how to properly conduct a poll.

        ““Okay, done it. I’ve just phoned up five thousand people and four thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine of them said they wanted a female Doctor. Only one person said no, and I think that was probably you. Did you get a call from me today?””
        “It wasn’t me sorry. Nice try but your sarcasm gave you away.”

        It’s not sarcasm, it’s a ‘barbed’ comment. Get used to it. However, it also appears to have done the job in pointing out how ridiculous your suggestion was that I should go off and conduct a country wide survey.

        “(Chris Chibnall has his hands full. Mark Gatiss is iffy and Neil Gaiman said he won’t do it) they can call it a day.”

        You don’t think Chris Chibnall is also ‘iffy’?

        ““Then they will have learned a useful life lesson, that we can’t have everything we want.””
        “Any parent can teach that to a kid by saying “NO,” when they throw a temper tantrum. You don;t need a TV show for that.”

        Then what’s your problem?

        “Terrance Dicks didn’t think so and was extremely angry with Robert Holmes.”

        He still did the Target novel adaptation. So he couldn’t have been that upset.

        ““I’m not being hostile.””
        “Not hostile? There was one guy who posted (no not the other poster who you had a lively debate with) his opinion and you ripped him to shreds.”

        Read it again. I meant not being hostile to you (yet). Anyway, who was this other poster you’re talking about? Was it the guy who believed women were controlling the world and had ruined his life through wearing short skirts and having boob implants, or was it that other chap who thought women should be repressed and not given an inch in case it encouraged other “minorities” to speak up and challenge the system? Nice company you keep.

        ““I am making a genuine enquiry as to the reason why you dislike the idea of a female Doctor Who,””
        “I’m not too crazy about the idea.”

        Not an answer.

        “Its just too gimmicky.”

        Again,not an answer and also not true. Since when was casting a woman in something a “gimmick”?

        “I don’t see the need for it.”

        Again, not an answer.

        “And does it have to be The Doctor who needs to change gender?”

        It can be anyone of them.

        “Its like Bruce Wayne or Indiana Jones getting a transgender surgery when they have female”

        Starbuck from Battlestar Galactica changed sex, and that worked out, in spite of the initial howls of protest from hard core fans.

        “I didn’t say I have kids.”

        Reading back over your previous posts, I certainly get the impression you were implying it. Now I’m starting to doubt you’re even a woman.

        “I just don’t like the idea of kids getting confused as to why the character they have known as a male is all of a sudden a woman.”

        Oh, my god, the poor children!!! They will be so confused, their heads will explode. In fact it might turn them all into transsexuals. Little Billy loved playing with his toy guns, but after the Doctor turned into a woman he now insists on wearing a dress, lipstick and carries around a handbag. We’re going to have to have him gassed. Far better for Billy to hate trannies and poofters than to be one. Wouldn’t you agree, Mec?

        “My nephew was upset when Matt Smith left. Is that a good enough answer for you? If its not then, I can’t help you and I don’t expect you to accept my answer.”

        That’s not an answer. Your nephew liked Matt Smith, and was sad when he left. What’s that got to do with the Doctor turning into a woman? Would your nephew have head-butted the TV in response? Would he have gone outside and beaten up someone to demonstrate his masculine heterosexuality? What sort of household does you nephew come from anyway? In the end, we are clearly talking about your prejudice here, not your nephew’s.

  2. Pingback: How sexist is Doctor Who? – The Intro… | Simon's incoherent blog

  3. Reblogged this on afternoonsisterbella and commented:
    I don’t like Doctor Who, primarily because two exes of mine loved it and I could never figure out the appeal. Unfortunately, my best friend loves it, so I can’t completely dismiss it. This is a very interesting read, if not for the Doctor Who component then for the ongoing discussion surrounding sexism and female characters on television.

  4. Well, given that actions speak louder than words, i would say that rose is worse than the rest of the companions together; she almost killed herself for the doctor, end up in trapped in an alternate universe, thanks to the doctor, and started to jump between universe, not caring about the damage that it could to the space-time continuum, just to be with the doctor. Besides of being rather clingy and jealous.

    • The thing is that when people say they want ‘good’ female characters, that translates to ‘well-written’, ‘as resolved as their male counterparts’ and ‘possessing of independent thought and character’. It has nothing to do with how nice of a person or ‘good’ they are in terms of personality, that’s not what is important. Write female characters who have bad personal qualities – that’s fine, those women do exist and diversity is the key to interesting characters – as long as they have those qualities mentioned before, otherwise it’s an inaccurate representation of a human being and plain lazy writing.

  5. Wow! This blog looks just like my old one! It’s on a completely different topic but it has pretty much
    the same layout and design. Great choice of colors!

  6. Pingback: 57 – Today Is about Change | Kat & Curt's TV Re-View

  7. Pingback: In Defense of Amy Pond Part II | Pulp & Fiction

  8. Howdy! I know this is somewhat off topic but I was wondering if
    you knew where I could get a captcha plugin for
    my comment form? I’m using the same blog platform as yours and I’m having difficulty finding one?
    Thanks a lot!

  9. Reblogged this on Susannah with an 'H' and commented:
    This post sums up some issues that I have, but have had trouble expressing, about Moffat’s era so far. Definitely a worthwhile read. Regardless of your opinions on the Bechdel test, this is something that needs to be addressed more often.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s